Green man

From PathfinderWiki
Green man
The Green Man.
(Creature)
Green man
(Deity)
Titles Leshy King
Alignment
Worshipers Intelligent plants, especially leshys
Edicts Discover or create new forms of plant life, foster the growth and well-being of flora, preserve areas of natural wilderness
Anathema Allow flagrant abuse of plant life to go unpunished, damage natural environments, harm plant life except in the pursuit of saving greater plant life
Cleric Alignments (1E)
Domains (1E) Plant, Protection, Strength, Weather (Neutral)
Good, Plant, Protection, Weather (Neutral good)
Evil, Plant, Strength, Weather (Neutral evil)
Subdomains (1E) Defense, Growth, Resolve, Seasons (Neutral)
Defense, Growth, Purity, Seasons (Neutral good)
Decay, Growth, Resolve, Seasons (Neutral evil)
Cleric Alignments (2E)
Domains (2E) Healing, Might, Nature, Protection
Favored Weapon Sickle
Symbol Masculine face made of leaves, details vary by individual
Images of green men

Source: Bestiary 6, pg(s). 152 (1E)
Bestiary 3, pg(s). 118
f. (2E)

Green men, sometimes called leshy kings in esoteric texts, are the divine avatars and guardians of the primeval forest.[1]

Appearance

Green men resemble humanoids made of leaves and bark, with vine-like fingers.[1]

Ecology

Green men are living embodiments of natural plant life. They form when a forest accumulates a large number of natural spirits, the same type of entities that individually incarnate as leshys and that answer commune with nature spells. Once a certain threshold is reached, this spirits coalesce and incarnate into a body formed from plant material, becoming a new green man.[2]

Despite their name, green men aren't necessarily male. As they originate from incorporeal spirits of nature that incarnate into a body made out of plant material, most green men find gender a meaningless concept. While some adopt gender in the manner of other beings, these can take on any gender.[2]

Society

Most green men focus almost exclusively on the flora of their homes, and only concern themselves with their animals, minerals, and other components insofar as they affect plants. They normally simply ignore the affairs of animals, a category that to them includes sapient beings such as humans, and are strictly neutral to greater moral questions and divides. However, some green men are explicitly good or evil in outlook; good green men extend their aid and wisdom to all who come into their homes, while evil green men foster the growth of dangerous plants and spread fear and death to any who might threaten plant life, often killing all non-plant life in their domains except for some animals kept to hunt for sport.[2]

Green men are believed by druids to have been the original source of the rituals used to create leshys, and potentially to have been responsible for the creation of other intelligent plants such as arboreals. Green men and leshys maintain a close bond with each other in the present.[2]

Cults and worshippers

Green men possess the ability to grant spells to beings that worship them, but typically restrict this boon to intelligent plants. In particular, leshys are the most likely group to worship green men. Occasionally, however, if an "animal" can prove itself a friend to plants and pass a strict vetting process, a green man will eagerly welcome the strange fleshy follower into the flock.[2]

The edicts and strictures of a green man's cult vary between individuals, but most require their followers to seek out or create new forms of plant life, work to ensure the healthy growth and spread of plants, and preserve natural wildernesses. Followers of green men are also typically forbidden from allowing flagrant destruction or abuse of plant life, damaging plant life themselves unless in an attempt to prevent a great loss of flora, or damaging natural environments.[2]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Robert Brookes et al. (2017). Pathfinder RPG Bestiary 6, p. 152–153. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-60125-931-8
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Logan Bonner, et al. (2021). Bestiary 3 (Second Edition), p. 118–119. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-64078-312-6